IdentityMine

| Tags: Devin Jordan, Mobile, Tips, Uncategorized

If you love the Windows Phone user experience, then you are going to love Windows 8. The future of tablet PCs is bright, and being at the forefront of touch and gesture-based technologies allows us to create more powerful consumer and enterprise applications. IdentityMine is excited for the release of the Windows 8 tablets (to be released early 2012), and we want to help you get ready for it:

HP Slate with Windows 8

Windows 8 Quick Facts

  • New Immersive applications that can be opened within the new skin of Windows 8 allowing the application to be split paned and resized.
  • It will include a 128-bit architectural display
  • Same system requirements as Windows 7 (sigh of relief for consumers/businesses wanting to upgrade to a new OS)
  • Enterprise features include the new portable Workspace, allowing you to run Windows from a portable USB device.
  • New Windows App marketplace

Windows 8 will be one of the most universal platforms to date - it will work on your PCs and Tablets, and supports many touch-based functions, much like the Windows Phone 7 interface.

What do Windows 8 and the Tablet explosion mean for businesses; and how companies leverage existing workstations using Windows 8?

With the introduction of Microsoft Windows 8 tablets, seamless integration between business computers and tablets will become effortless – editing server files from a remote location will be easier than ever. Windows 8 tablets support SoC (system-on-a-chip-) and ARM based processors, which means faster and more capable tablets at your fingertips. Windows 8 tablets will easily be able to integrate into your business ecosystem - most businesses use Windows Servers and PCs with Microsoft Office. This will position Microsoft as the legacy leader in enterprise software solutions.

The iPad has many multimedia uses, but aside from using it to surf the web and watch movies (yes it has more uses), the iPad is not easily integrated into most business networks that are comprised entirely of Windows OS (most businesses are).  We think iPads are great for personal use, but they fall short of the enterprise integration needed for big business.

Further, within the next year, there will be many Windows 8 tablets/slates to choose from which will drive innovation and force competitive pricing. Microsoft’s strategy to support a large array of form factors, all with the same OS is compelling, and this Microsoft OS will not be limited to entertainment products.

Enterprises will question the wisdom of switching to the iOS platform just to support a single hardware device, when they already have a significant investment in homegrown and licensed productivity/line of business apps built for the Windows platform. Companies that impulsively embraced the iPad may reevaluate their tablet options when faced with the sizable investment and paradigm shift that comes from switching to iOS.  This shift will be seen in the way enterprises develop their line of business (LOB) apps to support iOS.

Windows 8 tablets will be the missing link between all Microsoft products within a business ecosystem.

We love new toys, and it’s only a matter of time before Windows 8 tablets become ubiquitous within the consumer and enterprise community.  Our NUI experience is prime for this new hardware frontier. Giddyup!

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3 Responses to “Why Windows 8 Will Change Business”

  1. meni

    Meaning: “we bet heavily on Microsoft, didn’t quite work so far, we sure hope that the future is bright.”

    Reply

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